Frequently Asked Questions – Gynecology

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Dilation and Curettage

INSTRUCTIONS FOR HOME CARE FOLLOWING DILATION AND CURETTAGE SURGERY

ACTIVITY:  Rest in bed the day you are dismissed from the hospital.  You may want to decrease your activities and take short rest periods for the next few days.  No strenuous activities for 3-7 days.  This includes lifting or vigorous activities.

VAGINAL DISCHARGE:  You will have some bleeding from the vagina and you may experience mild cramps after your surgery.  By the time you go home, the bleeding should be light in amount and may last 2 to 3 weeks.  Your next menstrual period may occur at any time after this.

BATHING:  You may take a shower or wash your hair at any time you desire after you go home provided you do not feel too weak or tired.  It is advisable that you take a shower rather than a tub bath for the first week.

DOUCHING AND INTERCOURSE:  You should not douche, use tampons or have intercourse for one week after your surgery.

MEDICATIONS:  You may have mild cramping after surgery.  You may take Tylenol or Ibuprofen and use a heating pad if needed.

PATHOLOGY:  You will be notified of a pathology report within 7 working days.  If you have not heard from your doctor, please call.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS:  If your D&C has been scheduled because of a miscarriage there are a few special instructions you need to follow.  Refrain from anything entering the vagina for 2 weeks.  This includes bathtub water, douching, tampons, and intercourse.  You may or may not have tissue analysis with this procedure.  If you do, this analysis can take several weeks.  Our office will call you with results as soon as your physician has reviewed them.

AFTER LEAVING THE HOSPITAL,  call the doctor for any of the following problems:

  • Bleeding heavier that usual menstrual (period) flow
  • Any fever over 100.4 degrees or severe chills
  • Frequency or burning with urination (difficulties emptying your bladder)
  • Any red, hard, tender, or hot areas along the calf or groin of the legs
  • Chest pain, trouble breathing, or any other unexplained signs or symptoms

Laparoscopy

INSTRUCTIONS FOR HOME CARE FOLLOWING LAPAROSCOPIC EXAM

ACTIVITY:  You may want to decrease your activities and take short rest periods for the next few days.  No strenuous activities for one week.  This includes lifting over 10 pounds or vigorous exercise.

OPERATIVE WOUND:  The sutures holding the small incision will dissolve by themselves in one to three weeks after surgery and will not need to be removed.  The incision should be treated as an ordinary skin cut and should be kept dry for three to four days to assure good healing.  You may cleanse your incision with soap and water.

VAGINAL CARE:  You may have minimal bleeding from the vagina (birth canal) after your surgery.  You should not douche, use tampons, or have intercourse for one week after your surgery.  You may take a shower or wash your hair any time you desire after you go home provided you do not feel too weak or tired.  It is advisable that you take a shower rather than a tub bath for the first week.

MEDICATIONS:  You may have cramping and/or discomfort.  You may take Tylenol or Ibuprofen or any medication ordered by your physician, and use a heating pad if needed.

NUTRITION:  Your diet should be balanced with the essential vitamins and minerals. Unless otherwise advised you may eat a regular diet.  Adequate amounts of lean meat, fish, poultry, eggs, green and yellow vegetables, citrus fruits and juices, melon, whole grain bread, cereals, and mild products should help with the healing process.

CONSTIPATION:  If you re-establish the proper dietary habits, constipation should not be a problem.  Increase water/fluid intake.  Any food product that currently works in aiding to decrease problems with constipation can be tried.  You may also purchase Colace over the counter for constipation problems unresolved by the suggestions listed above.

AFTER LEAVING THE HOSPITAL:  Call the doctor for any of the following problems:

  • Bleeding heavier than usual menstrual (period) flow.
  • Any fever over 100.4 degrees or severe chills.
  • Frequency or burning with urination (difficulties emptying your bladder).
  • Any red, hard, tender or hot area along the calf or groin areas of the legs.
  • Chest pain, trouble breathing, or any other unexplained signs or symptoms

Anti-incontinence Surgery

INSTRUCTIONS FOR HOME CARE FOLLOWING ANTI INCONTINENCE SURGERY

ACTIVITIY: No intercourse, lifting, or exercise for three weeks.  You may resume all other activities as comfort allows.

OPERATIVE WOUND:  The sutures holding the small incisions will dissolve by themselves in one to three weeks after surgery and will not need to be removed.  The incision should be treated as an ordinary skin cut and should be kept dry for 3 to 4 days to ensure good healing.  You may cleanse your incision with soap and water or hydrogen peroxide.

PAIN:  You may experience bruising and tenderness in the incision areas.  Tylenol, Ibuprofen, and a heating pad should help resolve the discomfort.

MEDICATIONS:  A stool softener should be used after surgery until you are able to have a bowel movement without straining.  Colace may be purchased over the counter.  You may or may not receive a prescription for an antibiotic.  If so, please take the prescription in its entirety.

NUTRITION:  Your diet should be balanced with the essential vitamins and minerals.  Unless otherwise advised you may eat a regular diet.  Adequate amounts of lean meat, fish, poultry, eggs, green and yellow vegetables, citrus fruits and juices, melon, whole grain bread, cereals, and mild products should help with the healing process.

CONSTIPATION:  If you re-establish the proper dietary habits, constipation should not be a problem.  Increase water/fluid intake.  Any food product that currently works in aiding to decrease problems with constipation can be tried.  You may also purchase Colace over the counter for constipation problems unresolved by the suggestions listed above.

AFTER LEAVING THE HOSPITAL, call the doctor for any of the following problems:

  • Bleeding heavier than usual menstrual (period) flow.
  • Any fever over 100.4° or severe chills.
  • Frequency or burning with urination (difficulties emptying your bladder).
  • Any red, hard, tender or hot area along the calf or groin areas of the legs.
  • Chest pain, trouble breathing, or any other unexplained signs or symptoms

Laparoscopic Vaginal Hysterectomy

INSTRUCTIONS FOR HOME CARE FOLLOWING
LAPAROSCOPIC ASSISTED HYSTERECTOMY SURGERY

Now that your operation is over, you will soon be thinking about going home.  Because the four to six weeks after your hospital dismissal is an important part of your recovery, you should follow your doctor’s instructions very carefully.  The goal of these instructions is to reduce the risks of surgical infection, upper respiratory infection and blood clots.

ACTIVITY:   You may be dismissed the night of surgery or the next day depending on your post-surgical status.  During your first week home, you should spend your day resting and caring for your personal needs.  The best exercise for you during this time is walking and you may be up for several hours each day.  It is better however, to have short periods of activity rather than to remain on your feet continuously.  To obtain the best type of rest, you should lie down.  Avoid sitting in a chair for long periods or crossing your legs at the knees or ankles as it slows the return flow of blood from your legs.  You may rest in a reclining chair.  Your second week at home your may take longer walks or ride a short distance in the car.  If long distance travel is required, you should try to stop, get out, and walk about every 60 minutes.  Before driving, the use of prescription pain medications must be ceased. We also recommend that you have tried to use the brakes, forcefully in your vehicle with the vehicle in park.  We want to make sure you are comfortable using the brakes of your vehicle in an emergent situation after surgery.  During this time it is important that you avoid lifting over 10 pounds, strenuous exercise, excessive social activities and you should keep stairs to a minimum.  It is important to be sensible about your care and do things in moderation.  When healing is complete, you may expect to resume a normal active life.  The return to ordinary employment usually takes about 4 weeks after surgery.  Normal fatigue may last anywhere from 6-8 weeks due to caloric requirements of surgery healing.

OPERATIVE WOUND:  The sutures from the laparoscope will dissolve by themselves in a week to ten days after surgery and will not need to be removed.  The incision should be treated as an ordinary skin cut and should be kept dry for three to four days to assure good healing.  You may cleanse your incision with soap and water.

VAGINAL DISCHARGE:  Frequently after surgery involving the tubes, ovaries, or uterus, you will have minimal bleeding from the vagina (birth canal), which may last several weeks or longer. Your doctor should be called however, if excessive amounts of bright red bleeding are present. An external pad, rather than a tampon, should be used for any vaginal bleeding.  Because of the hysterectomy, you will no longer menstruate (have periods).  If you had a vaginal hysterectomy, stitches in your vagina will dissolve in the next 2-6 weeks.  You may have bright red spotting; it will turn to a yellowish discharge. You might have a slight odor-this is normal and will resolve. The odor should seem different, but not offensive.

PAIN:  You may be given a prescription for pain medication prior to dismissal, or you may take Tylenol or Ibuprofen for pain.  You may use a heating pad.  You will not be free from pain during your recovery.  You should however, expect tolerable pain.  If your pain is intolerable after trying the previous methods call your doctor.

BATHING: You may take a shower or wash your hair at anytime you desire after you go home providing you do not feel too weak or tired.  Refrain from taking tub baths for 2 weeks.

DOUCHING:  No douching, intercourse, or tampons until you see your physician and he/she indicates resuming any of these activities.  You may use vaginal medication as instructed by your physician.

NUTRITION:  It is essential that your diet be high in protein and Vitamin C.  Unless otherwise instructed you may eat whatever you wish.  Adequate amounts of lean meat, fish, poultry, eggs, green vegetables, whole grain cereals/breads, and citrus fruits/juices must be included in your diet.  Stay away from spicy foods or foods you know cause gas.  You may need to eat frequent, snack size meals initially.

CONSTIPATION:  If you re-establish proper dietary habits, constipation should not be a problem. This includes six to eight glasses of water daily, as well as the information provided above in the nutrition section of these instructions.  Walking will also help promote movement in the colon to help reduce the risk of constipation.  You may try home remedies such as prunes or hot drinks. You may try over the counter remedies such as Colace or Milk of Magnesia. It is important for you to understand that pain medications taken during your hospitalization and home recovery can and frequently does cause constipation problems.  We suggest a minimum of one bowel movement every two days with out strain.  If all of your efforts are not getting this effect, call your physician.

BLADDER FUNCTION:  You will receive full instructions and necessary prescriptions before leaving the hospital if special measures or medications are indicated.  Burning, frequency, and urgency with urination are normal the first few times you urinate while you are hospitalized.  If these symptoms occur after you have been dismissed, please call your doctor.

MEDICATIONS:  Your nurse or physician will instruct you on medications as needed.  This includes hormone replacement if indicated.

AFTER LEAVING THE HOSPITAL:  Call you doctor if you have:

  1. Frequency or burning with urination (difficulties emptying your bladder).
  2. Excessively heavy vaginal bleeding (from the birth canal).
  3. Severe chills or fever over 100.4 degrees.
  4. Abnormal redness and tenderness around the incision.
  5. Any red, hard, tender or hot area along the calf or groin areas of the legs.
  6.  Chest pain, trouble breathing, or any other unexplained signs or symptoms.

Abdominal/Vaginal Surgery

INSTRUCTIONS FOR HOME CARE FOLLOWING ABDOMINAL AND VAGINAL SURGERY

Now that your operation is over, you will soon be thinking about going home.  Because the four to six weeks after your hospital dismissal is an important part of your recovery, you should follow your doctor’s instructions very carefully.  The goal of these instructions is to reduce the risks of surgical infection, upper respiratory infection and blood clots.

ACTIVITY:   You may be dismissed the night of surgery or the next day depending on your post-surgical status.  During your first week home, you should spend your day resting and caring for your personal needs.  The best exercise for you during this time is walking and you may be up for several hours each day.  It is better however, to have short periods of activity rather than to remain on your feet continuously.  To obtain the best type of rest, you should lie down.  Avoid sitting in a chair for long periods or crossing your legs at the knees or ankles as it slows the return flow of blood from your legs.  You may rest in a reclining chair.  Your second week at home your may take longer walks or ride a short distance in the car.  If long distance travel is required, you should try to stop, get out, and walk about every 60 minutes.  Before driving, the use of prescription pain medication must be ceased. We also recommend that you have tried to use the brakes, forcefully in your vehicle with the vehicle in park.  We want to make sure you are comfortable using the brakes of your vehicle in an emergent situation after surgery.  During this time it is important that you avoid lifting over 10 pounds, strenuous exercise, excessive social activities and you should keep stairs to a minimum.  It is important to be sensible about your care and do things in moderation.  When healing is complete, you may expect to resume a normal active life.  The return to ordinary employment usually takes about 4 weeks after surgery.  Normal fatigue may last anywhere from 6-8 weeks due to caloric requirements of surgery healing.

OPERATIVE WOUND:  The abdominal incision should be healing well by the time you go home.  You will either have a running stitch or staples placed to hold the incision during your recovery.  Individual doctors will decide wound closure based on your needs as an individual.  If steri-strips are used, they are in place to help keep the wound edges together.  You may shower with steri-strips, just dry the area thoroughly.  The steri-strips will begin to curl toward the wound.  If they are still in place after 12 days you may remove them.  The vaginal incision for a hysterectomy and or vaginal repairs is much different.  The incisions in this case are in the vagina and will not be visible to you. Cautery or dissolvable sutures can be used.  Dissolvable sutures in the vagina dissolve within 2-6 weeks.

VAGINAL DISCHARGE:  Frequently after surgery involving the tubes, ovaries, or uterus, you will have minimal bleeding from the vagina (birth canal), which may last several weeks or longer.  Your doctor should be called however, if excessive amounts of bright red bleeding are present.  An external pad, rather than a tampon, should be used for any vaginal bleeding.  Because of the hysterectomy, you will no longer menstruate (have periods).  If you had a vaginal hysterectomy, stitches in your vagina will dissolve in the next 2-6 weeks.  You may have bright red spotting; it will turn to a yellowish discharge. You might have a slight odor-this is normal and will resolve.  The odor should seem different, but not offensive.

PAIN:  You may be given a prescription for pain medication prior to dismissal, or you may take Tylenol or Ibuprofen for pain.  You may use a heating pad.  You will not be free from pain during your recovery.  You should however, expect tolerable pain.  If your pain is intolerable after trying the previous methods call your doctor.

BATHING: You may take a shower or wash your hair at anytime you desire after you go home providing you do not feel too weak or tired.  Refrain from taking tub baths for 2 weeks.

DOUCHING:  No douching, intercourse, or tampons until you see your physician and he/she indicates resuming any of these activities.  You may use vaginal medication as instructed by your physician.

NUTRITION:  It is essential that your diet be high in protein and Vitamin C.  Unless otherwise instructed you may eat whatever you wish.  Adequate amounts of lean meat, fish, poultry, eggs, green vegetables, whole grain cereals/breads, and citrus fruits/juices must be included in your diet.  Stay away from spicy foods or foods you know cause gas. You may need to eat frequent, snack size meals initially.

CONSTIPATION:  If you re-establish proper dietary habits, constipation should not be a problem.  This includes six to eight glasses of water daily, as well as the information provided above in the nutrition section of these instructions.  Walking will also help promote movement in the colon to help reduce the risk of constipation.  You may try home remedies such as prunes or hot drinks.  You may try over the counter remedies such as Colace or Milk of Magnesia. It is important for you to understand that pain medications taken during your hospitalization and home recovery can and frequently does cause constipation problems.  We suggest a minimum of one bowel movement every two days with out strain.  If all of your efforts are not getting this effect, call your physician.

BLADDER FUNCTION:  You will receive full instructions and necessary prescriptions before leaving the hospital if special measures or medications are indicated.  Burning, frequency, and urgency with urination are normal the first few times you urinate while you are hospitalized.  If these symptoms occur after you have been dismissed, please call your doctor.

MEDICATIONS:  Your nurse or physician will instruct you on medications as needed. This included hormone replacement if indicated.

AFTER LEAVING THE HOSPITAL:  Call you doctor if you have:

  • Frequency or burning with urination (difficulties emptying your bladder).
  • Excessively heavy vaginal bleeding (from the birth canal).
  • Severe chills or fever over 100.4 degrees.
  • Abnormal redness and tenderness around the incision.
  • Any red, hard, tender or hot area along the calf or groin areas of the legs.
  • Chest pain, trouble breathing, or any other unexplained signs or symptoms.

Bowel Prep

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PRE OPERATIVE BOWEL PREP

Your doctor has decided you need rigorous bowel preparation before surgery. This bowel preparation will be a very important step for you to complete.  The bowel preparation assists in decreasing surgical risk factors associated with your upcoming surgery.  Your surgery may be cancelled if the bowel preparation is not completed.

The day prior to surgery you will consume clear liquids the entire day.  You may have water, 7-Up, Sprite, Gatorade, chicken or beef broth, Popsicles, Jell-o, and coffee and tea.  It is vital that all dairy and citrus products be avoided.  This includes fruit and/or toppings with Jell-o, pulps and/or cream in Popsicles, and creamer in coffee.

Magnesium Citrate is an over-the-counter, pre-mixed solution you will need to purchase.  The day prior to surgery, at 12:00 noon, you need to drink the Magnesium Citrate.  This solution will cause diarrhea.  The solution can be consumed later in the day, however the later you begin, the later the solution begins to work.

You can continue to consume liquids after taking the Magnesium Citrate.  At 12:00 midnight you will begin fasting.  Continue this fasting the morning of surgery.  Your surgery may be cancelled if you are not able to maintain a fasting status.

Endometrial Ablation

INSTRUCTIONS FOR HOME CARE FOLLOWING ENDOMETRIAL ABLATION SURGERY

ACTIVITY:  Rest in bed the day you are dismissed from the hospital.  You may want to decrease your activities and take short rest periods for the next few days.  No strenuous activities for one week.  This includes lifting over 10 pounds or vigorous exercise.

VAGINAL DISCHARGE:  You may have some bleeding from the vagina (birth canal) and you may experience cramps after your surgery.  You may experience a yellowish, watery discharge that may last for several weeks.  Your menstrual period may occur at any time after this.  You may find your periods much lighter or none at all.

BATHING:  You may take a shower or wash your hair any time you desire after you go home provided you do not feel too weak or tired.  It is advisable that you take a shower rather than a tub bath for the first week.

DOUCHING & SEXUAL RELATIONS:  You should not douche, use tampon, or have sexual intercourse for one week after your surgery.

MEDICATIONS:  You may have cramping and/or discomfort.  You may take Tylenol or Ibuprofen or any medication ordered by your physician, and use a heating pad if needed.

AFTER LEAVING THE HOSPITAL, call the doctor for any of the following problems:

  • Bleeding heavier than usual menstrual (period) flow.
  • Any fever over 100.4° or severe chills.
  • Frequency or burning with urination (difficulties emptying your bladder).
  • Any red, hard, tender or hot area along the calf or groin areas of the legs.
  • Chest pain, trouble breathing, or any other unexplained signs or symptoms.

 

If an endometrial sample is taken, you will be notified of the pathology report after 4-7 working days.  Call the office if you have not been notified by then.

Birth Control Pills

More than 60 million women take the pill worldwide and it is the most popular form of contraception in the United States. Most pills contain estrogen and progestin and work by preventing ovulation. Used correctly (taking it at about the same time every day), it is 99% effective. Pills available today are a much lower dose than the original birth control pill of the 1960’s and have fewer side effects.
Side Effects

There are some minor side effects associated with the birth control pill. These include: breakthrough bleeding (bleeding between periods), nausea, headaches, and breast tenderness. Many of these side effects decrease during the first three months of usage.
Advantages

The advantages of the pill are that it does not interrupt sexual activity and allows for spontaneity. It offers protection against ovarian, endometrial, and colo-rectal cancers. The pill decreases menstrual bleeding and cramping. The pill also decreases the risk of PID (pelvic inflammatory disease) and can shrink some benign ovarian cysts. It is an easily reversible method.
Disadvantages

The disadvantages are that it offers no protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STD’s). It can be expensive, it must be taken consistently every day and can cause mood changes. It can also cause rare, but dangerous complications.

Not all women are good candidates for the birth control pill. You should not take the pill if you are over 35 and smoke. You should not take the pill if you begin getting SEVERE migraine headaches after starting the birth control pill. Women who have a history of blood clots or stroke, have heart disease, or high blood pressure, have had breast cancer, have liver problems, have kidney problems or have active gallbladder disease should not take the pill.

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Intercourse

Unless you’ve been told to refrain or there is a specific problem with the pregnancy, such as bleeding, leaking bag of water, or preterm contractions, sexual intercourse is safe during pregnancy. It may be necessary to experiment to avoid discomfort. If intercourse is painful or causes bleeding or prolonged contractions (it is normal to have some contractions following intercourse), please talk with your physician or midwife.

Medicines Safe to Take

Before taking any over-the-counter or prescription medication not mentioned below, you should check with the office.

You should not take aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen sodium unless directed to do so by your physician or midwife. Regular strength acetaminophen (Tylenol) is the medication of choice for pain or fever. If you have a fever of 100.4 or higher, please call the office.

For sinus congestion with colds, allergies, or flu, pseudoephedrine (Sudafed) may be used. You also may use a saline nasal spray, such as Ocean or Nasal. Do not use Neosynephrine nasal spray for longer than 3 days. You may take Robitussin DM for coughs or chest congestion. A warm salt-water gargle is recommended for a sore throat. Throat drops, spray, or lozenges are acceptable. A cool air vaporizer may help you sleep at night. Increased fluid intake and getting sufficient rest are essential. If your nasal or throat drainage changes from a clear color, please call the office.

Warning Signs

The important warning signs of pregnancy are:

Vaginal bleeding
Leaking vaginal fluid
Change or decrease in baby’s movement (once you start feeling movement at 18-24 weeks)
Sever headaches accompanied by increased swelling in hands and feet and/or face and visual changes such as spots before your eyes
Burning with urination
Temperature above 100.4 degrees

If any of these occur please contact the office immediately.

Minor/Temporary Complaints

Bleeding

Spotting of blood may occur in 40% of all normal pregnancies during the first trimester. If you are spotting, begin best rest and call the office. Avoid heavy lifting, exercise, and sexual intercourse for 48 hours after the last episode of spotting.

Constipation

You should be drinking 8 to 10 glasses of liquids a day while you’re pregnant. This will help to prevent you becoming constipated in the first place. Fruit juices such as prune and apple juice are very good at keeping you regular and should be included. You should also increase the fiber in your diet by eating bran or shredded wheat cereals, bran muffins, raw fruits and vegetables. Daily exercise, particularly walking, will also help to prevent constipation. If constipation should occur, there are several non-prescription medications that may be used – Metamucil, Citrucel, Fibercon, Per Diem, Fibermed Biscuits, Haley’s MO, and Milk of Magnesia.

Diarrhea

Should this happen increase your fluids intake to at least 6 to 8 glasses every day. Avoid milk or milk products until the diarrhea has stopped. Eat foods such as bananas, rice, apple sauce, tea, and toast for 24 hours. If you obtain no relief you may use Kaopectate or Imodium which can be purchased without a prescription. If the diarrhea continues for more than 24 hours, please call the office.

Edema

Some edema, or swelling, is normal during pregnancy. Generally edema appears in the ankles and legs during the final months of pregnancy. To reduce your discomfort you should elevate your legs whenever possible. Other things you can do are to rest on your left side and reduce your intake of foods containing salt (many foods such as fast food, pizza, deli meats, boxed food, ready made meals and food from a can or jar such as spaghetti sauce and canned tomatoes contain large amounts of salt). Drinking an adequate amount of water is the best way to get rid of excess swelling, so drink 8 to 10 glasses a day. Please call the office if the swelling is severe or if accompanied by a headache unrelieved by Tylenol, or if you have visual changes, or upper right abdominal pain.

Heartburn or Indigestion

Eat small, frequent meals (5 or 6 a day). Drink liquids, especially milk, between meals rather than with meals. Avoid fatty or fried foods, alcohol (which we recommend you avoid at all times during your pregnancy) and carbonated beverages. Sit up during and for one hour following meals. You may use non-prescription low sodium antacids such as Maalox, Tums or Rolaids – do not use one with simethicone (an anti-gas formula). Zantac or Pepcid may be helpful. You can also try eating crackers. If no relief with these measures, notify your provider.

Nausea (Morning Sickness)

Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy is commonly referred to as “morning sickness”, but it can occur at any time of the day or night, usually when the stomach is empty. Keeping something in your stomach by eating small, frequent meals (5 or 6 a day) will help to prevent it from happening. Avoid spicy and greasy foods. Try antacids to help settle your stomach and eat a clear liquid diet for 24 hours. If nausea is a problem when you get up in the morning, try a high protein snack before bed and eat something before getting out of bed in the morning such as pretzels or soda crackers. Dehydration can also increase your nausea so drink plenty of fluids. Avoid unpleasant odors. Over-the-counter seasickness medication helps some people. Taking your vitamin at night may help, or switching to a chewable formula. Emetrol, a sugar-based syrup, can be purchased without a prescription and may be helpful. Vitamin B6 over-the-counter is a good first choice in treating morning sickness. If these conservative measures are not successful in getting your nausea/vomiting to an acceptable level, please notify your provider.

You should call the office anytime you are unable to keep fluids down for 24 hours.
Urinary Tract Infections

Symptoms of a urinary tract infection include pain or burning with urination and increased frequency of urination. The urine may be cloudy or have a strong odor. Unexplained lower abdominal cramping, often accompanied by a backache, can also mean a UTI. An untreated urinary tract infection can cause premature labor, so do not delay seeking treatment. If you suffer from these symptoms you should call the office and we will arrange a urinalysis for you. It is essential to drink plenty of water and fruit juices (8 to 10 glasses a day) if you think you have a urinary tract infection. You should also avoid caffeinated and carbonated beverages, as they can irritate the bladder and increase your pain and discomfort.

Cystoscopy

Cystoscopy is a simple office procedure that allows us to look at areas inside the urethra and bladder through a small scope that usually do not show up well on X-rays. We perform this procedure to look for foreign bodies, stones, tumors, bleeding, and infection inside the bladder. Cystoscopy can also be used to treat some bladder problems and may eliminate the need for more extensive surgery. This can be done in the office or as a day surgery.

Urodynamics

This is a term that describes a series of diagnostic tests used to show how your bladder functions. It involves placing a pressure sensitive catheter in the bladder which measures pressures during filling and emptying of the bladder. These tests will provide answers to clinical questions that arise about a patient’s bladder and outlet function if they are suffering from specific complaints such as incontinence, urgency, pain, slow stream, frequency, hesitancy and other urinary problems.

Pelvic Floor Reconstruction

When the muscles on the pelvic floor become damaged or weak – often as a result of childbirth – they are unable to support the weight of some or all of the pelvic and abdominal organs. If this occurs, one or more of the organs may drop below their normal positions, causing symptoms including discomfort, pain, pressure and urinary incontinence.

Depending on the requirements of the patient we offer both non-surgical and reconstructive surgery for this troublesome condition.

Sling Procedures

We are able to perform this procedure for women with severe stress incontinence caused by weak sphincter muscles.

Bulking Agents

We perform this treatment for stress incontinence, where Periurethral bulking agents are injected to increase tissue bulk around the urethra, in our office.

Pelvic Floor Retraining

This service involves biofeedback therapy to teach the patient how to coordinate the use of the abdominal muscles with the pelvic floor muscles. Pelvic floor retraining improves symptoms in approximately 70 percent of patients who have stress incontinence as well as those with excessive straining when attempting to stool.

Botox for the overactive bladder

Botox is a treatment for frequency, urgency and urge urinary incontinence in women who have been unresponsive to more conventional therapies or are unable to tolerate other medicines. It is a very simple procedure done in the office or as a day surgery. Through a cystoscope tiny amounts of Botox are injected into the bladder lining. Most women require repeated doses every 9-12 months.